Sunday, November 23, 2014

What Should Parents Have to Go Through in Order to Get a Charter School?

Colorado isn't like most states in the nation where a charter school can get approved by showing there is a need in a particular community. Some districts in Colorado believe there needs to be a certain amount of parents at public hearings in order to approve a charter school. Why should hard-working families, possibly with a language barrier, be required to show up at a school board meeting in order to get a high quality education for their child?

Or is it a convenient excuse for districts to deny a charter school because they don't want the competition? School board meetings can start as early as 4 PM on a school night. For families where both parents work, many are still at work until 5 or 6 PM and then immediately go home and make dinner for their families. Then there's homework and hopefully a decent bedtime for young students. A schedule that's not conducive for young families to attend school board meetings.

Having been at dozens of school board meetings in my time, it's fairly typical for school board members to think their work is the most important thing going on in the community. Why wouldn't people think they need to show up at a school board meeting?

School board members welcome public comment. To clarify, a particular type of public comment from the citizens in its district. Positive comments. Many school board members view a proposed charter school as threatening. Threatening against the status quo the district offers. Threatening against the good things they believe they're doing. Most importantly, charter schools are viewed - by some school board members - as trying to "take their kids."

Parents believe they can make the best decision for their individual children. Parents know that each child is different and that a one-size-fits-all approach to education just doesn't work for their children. Parents want more. They want choice. Why should that be so difficult?